A study of consumer purchases and purchase intentions

When planning Mother’s Day, Father’s Day and bridal programs, retailers should consider highlighting electric mixers, toaster-ovens, food processors and handheld vacuum cleaners.

More than a quarter of the electric mixers, toaster-ovens, food processors and handheld vacuumcleaners purchased from February through July of 1984 were given as gifts.

These appliances were in greatest demand during the Mother’s Day, Father’s Day and bridal gift-giving season. More toaster-ovens were purchased in May than in any other month, while more food processors and handheld vacuum cleaners were purchased in June. More electric mixers were purchased in July, but June ran a close second.

Consumer Track, HFD’s new semi-annual survey of consumer purchases and purchase intentions, turned up other findings:

* In the past six months, 43 percent of households purchased one or more of the 19 housewares products listed. (Chart 1)

* Almost two-thirds of the purchasers brought just one of the products.

* Microwave cookware was the top purchase, followed by coffeemakers, metal cookware, everyday glassware and curling irons/brushes. (Chart 1)

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* In electrics, coffeemakers were the top purchase, followed by curling irons/brushes, irons, hair dryers and digital alarm clocks. (Chart 1)

* In non-electrics, microwave cookware was the top purchase, followed by metal cookware, everyday glassware, metal bakeware and non-electric knives. (Chart 1)

* More than two-thirds of the irons, toasters, full-sized vacuums, electric can openers, coffeemakers and hair dryers purchased replaced products that households had owned.

* Less than one-third of the everyday glassware, non-electric knives, hand-held vacuums, food processors and microwave cookware purchased replaced products that households had owned.

More than a quarter of the electric mixers, toasters-ovens, food processors and hand-held vacuums were purchased as gifts. (Chart 4)

* Half of the households that made a purchase reported buying something at a discount store. (Chart 3)

* In the past six months, 43.4 percent of the 5,788 households surveyed purchased one or more of the products listed. When making a purchase they favored discount stores over all other retail outlets. In fact, 50.1 percent of households that made a purchase reported buying something at a discount store, 17.4 percent at a department store, 12.3 percent at a national chain (Sears, Penney, Ward, K mart), 11.4 percent at a catalog showroom, 5.2 percent at a hardware store and 3 percent at an appliance outlet. And 23.8 percent reported buying something at another type of retail outlet. The percentages add up to more than 100 due to multiple responses from households. (Chart 3)

Discount stores accounted for an even greater share of purchases in certain categories. Their share was highest in analog alarm clocks (60 percent), toasters (54.5 percent) microwave cookware (52.9 percent). Their share was lowest in full-sized vacuum cleaners (14 percent), food processors (23.7 percent) and non-electric knives (23.8 percent).

Department stores also garnered a greater than average share in certain categories. Their share was highest in metal cookware (26.1 percent), non-electric knives (22.2 percent), and electric mixers (18.6). Their share was lowest in hair dryers (8.3 percent), toasters (9 percent) and wall clocks (9.6 percent).

National chains fared well in full-sized vacuum cleaners, claiming 28.5 percent share of units purchased in the past six months. They fared poorly in toaster-ovens and analog alarm clocks, claiming 3.4 percent share, respectively.

Catalog showrooms fared well in toaster-ovens and food processors, claiming 19.3 and 18.6 percent share, respectively. They fared poorly in certain in certain non-electric categories, though, claiming a 1.8 percent share in everyday glassware, 2.3 percent in metal bakeware, and 2.4 percent in non-electric knives.

In certain categories, a high percentage of purchases were made at other types of retail outlets. For instance, 42.9 percent of the non-electric knives were purchased elsewhere. It might be assumed that specialty stores accounted for some of those purchases.

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And, in metal bakeware, 29.5 percent of purchases were made elsewhere. It might be assumed that supermarkets accounted for some of those purchases. In everyday glassware, 29.2 percent of purchases were made elsewhere. Again, it might be assumed the supermarkets accounted for some of those purchases.

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More than 90 percent of the households that made a purchase indicated the price paid (Chart. 2). The products with the highest average price were electrics, namely full-sized vacuums ($198.93), food processors ($93.15) and toaster-ovens ($47.57). The products with the lowest average price were everyday glassware ($7.95), metal bakeware ($8.07) and curling irons/brushes (8.55).

High-ticket products often had high “gift profiles as well. Note that 29.5 percent of the electric mixers and toaster-ovens were purchased as gifts and that 27.8 percent of the food processors were purchased as gifts. (Chart 4).

Other products with high gift profiles included hand-held vacuums (25.8 percent), non-electric knives (23.7 percent), metal cookware (22.9 percent, electric can openers (21.8 percent) and wall clocks (20.9 percent).

The survey, which tracked purchases from February through July 1984, showed that more toaster-ovens and electric can openers were purchased in May than in any other single month, while more food processors and handheld vacuums were purchased in June. Keeping in mind that these are high “gift profile” products, it might be assumed that toaster-ovens and electric can openers were purchased for Mother’s Day presents, while food processors and handheld vacuum cleaners were purchased for wedding or Father’s Day presents.

In most categories, the majority of households purchased an item to replace one they already owned. Electrics were more often replacement purchases than non-electrics. In fact, more than two-thirds of the irons, toasters, full-sized vacuums, electric can openers, coffee-makers, and hair dryers were purchased as replacements.

Less than one-third of the microwave cookware, food processors, hand-held vacuums, non-electric knives and everyday glassware were purchased as replacements. It might be assumed that non-electric knives and everyday glassware were purchased as additions to the collections the households already had, and that microwave cookware, food processors and handheld vacuumcleaners were first-time purchases.

Source: http://bestvacuumforhardwoodfloors.net/